Florida Cannabis Information Portal

Florida Cannabis Information Portal

Serving the community since 2008.

Marijuana Laws
Learn all about marijuana legislation in Florida including the laws governing the cultivation, processing, distribution, sales, and use of marijuana and marijuana product
Marijuana Laws
Learn all about marijuana legislation in Florida including the laws governing the cultivation, processing, distribution, sales, and use of marijuana and marijuana product
Marijuana Business
Florida has specific licenses for marijuana growers, processors, transporters, dispensaries, microbusinesses, and event organizers. Know what it takes to start a marijuana business in the state
Marijuana Business
Florida has specific licenses for marijuana growers, processors, transporters, dispensaries, microbusinesses, and event organizers. Know what it takes to start a marijuana business in the state
Medical Marijuana
Florida legalized medical marijuana in 2016 through a ballot initiative that got 71% of the vote. This follows a failed first attempt and a limited-use authorization of cannabis for terminally ill patients. Find out more about the 2014 and 2016 Florida Amendment 2 leading to the legalization of medical marijuana in the state.
Medical Marijuana
Florida legalized medical marijuana in 2016 through a ballot initiative that got 71% of the vote. This follows a failed first attempt and a limited-use authorization of cannabis for terminally ill patients. Find out more about the 2014 and 2016 Florida Amendment 2 leading to the legalization of medical marijuana in the state.
CBD
Hemp-derived CBD products containing less than 0.3% THC are legal in Florida. The state only permits marijuana-derived CBD products with higher THC contents for approved medical cannabis users. Learn more about how Florida’s CBD laws align with the 2018 federal Farm Bill.
CBD
Hemp-derived CBD products containing less than 0.3% THC are legal in Florida. The state only permits marijuana-derived CBD products with higher THC contents for approved medical cannabis users. Learn more about how Florida’s CBD laws align with the 2018 federal Farm Bill.

What is the State of Marijuana in Florida?

Marijuana is only legal for medical use in Florida. Its recreational use remains currently prohibited. Proponents of marijuana legalization have sought to enact a law permitting the recreational use of marijuana in Florida. The efforts have fallen short though, and supporters of marijuana legalization have resorted to a citizen-initiative process for amending the Florida Constitution.

One such Initiative would have authorized the possession, use, exhibition, purchase, or transportation of cannabis and cannabis products in amounts reasonably suggestive of personal use or use by household members. The Initiative would also have allowed homeowners to cultivate and process 6 mature flowering cannabis plants per household member 21 years of age or older. However, the Initiative stipulated that mature blooming plants may only be cultivated inside or in a closed greenhouse, and that the cannabis produced could not be sold. In June 2021, the Florida Supreme Court rejected the Initiative and its proposed amendments which would have gone to the 2022 ballot.

Individuals may register as medicinal marijuana patients in Florida if their doctors certify that they suffer from one or more of the following conditions:

  • Cancer
  • Epilepsy
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Parkinson's disease
  • Crohn's disease
  • PTSD
  • ALS
  • Medical conditions related to or comparable to those listed
  • A terminal condition diagnosed by a physician other than the doctor who issued the physician certification.
  • Chronic nonmalignant pain induced by a qualifying medical condition or originating from a qualifying medical condition that lasts longer than the normal course of that qualifying medical condition

To be considered a qualified medicinal marijuana user in Florida, you must meet the following requirements:

  • Be a Florida resident, either permanently or seasonally.
  • Be added to a medicinal marijuana registry. The Medical Marijuana Use Registry is a safe, online database where ordering doctors and eligible patients may register.
  • Obtain a medical marijuana ID card

Qualified patients must be permanent or seasonal residents of Florida and be at least 18 years of age. Florida allows for certain exceptions to the age limit. Minors who qualify for medical marijuana are typically required to exhibit medical needs. They must have their parents or legal guardians complete their medical marijuana process and purchase medical marijuana on their behalf. Confirmation that palliative use of marijuana is required for minors is required to be provided by two physicians: a board-certified specialist (Board of Medicine and the Board of Osteopathic Medicine) and the minor's primary care doctor. Such conditions include:

  • Cerebral Palsy
  • Cystic Fibrosis
  • Irreversible Spinal Cord Injury with Objective Neurological Indication of Intractable Spasticity
  • Severe Epilepsy
  • Terminal Illness Requiring End-Of-Life Care
  • Uncontrolled Intractable Seizure Disorder
  • Muscular Dystrophy
  • Osteogenesis Imperfecta

You can get a medical marijuana card in Florida even if you have a previous felony conviction.

Medical marijuana patients can purchase medical marijuana from registered marijuana dispensaries, which may also be referred to as Medical Marijuana Treatment Centers (MMTCs). Only licensed medical marijuana treatment centers (MMTCs) in Florida are permitted to produce, process, and distribute low-THC cannabis and medicinal marijuana. You can find MMTCs in Florida by using the MMTC search tool on the Office of Medical Marijuana Use (OMMU) website.

The Florida OMMU, under the aegis of the Department of Health, writes and implements the State's rules for medical marijuana and oversees statewide medical marijuana use. The OMMU also authorizes Florida businesses to grow, process, and distribute medical marijuana to eligible patients, as well as certify marijuana testing labs to protect the public's health and safety in the marijuana industry.

Possession of up to 20 grams of marijuana is considered a misdemeanor in Florida, punishable by a jail term of 12 months and a $1,000 fine. Possessing more than 20 grams of marijuana is a felony punishable by up to five years in prison and a $5,000 fine. It is a felony offense to distribute or sell it within 1,000 feet of a school, college, park, or other specified place, and it is punished by up to 15 years in prison and a $10,000 fine.

How has Marijuana Affected the Florida Economy?

Medicinal marijuana has been legal in Florida since 2016 and the state is beginning to experience significant economic impact. According to a market research report, estimates for medical cannabis sale in Florida was put at $626 million in 2018. The same report forecasted that sales would top $1.6 billion by 2022. By comparison, the Marijuana Business Daily had estimated sales of medical cannabis to be between $225 and $300 million in 2018. The Marijuana Business Daily is a trusted business news outlet for professionals in the recreational and medical cannabis industry in the United States.

Although recreational marijuana has yet to be legalized in Florida, a report by the Florida Office of Economic and Demographic Research, claimed that if recreational marijuana use was approved in 2020, the Florida economy would be boosted with a whopping $190 million injection in sales tax and tourism every year. The $190 million figure was based on Florida's standard sales tax of 5 or 6 percent. Proceeds were projected to go even higher if marijuana products were subject to an increased tax similar to those in other states, where taxes were as high as 15%.

According to Whitney Economics, the medicinal marijuana industry in Florida will generate roughly 15,000 new employment by 2020, employing an estimated 31,500 residents. According to the study, the state reported about $1.23 billion in marijuana sales in 2020, outpacing sales in every other state in the United States where marijuana is legal for adults save Colorado and California.

Medical marijuana patient registrations rose in 2020, according to Florida's Office of Medical Marijuana Use (OMMU), with more than 170,000 new registrations. On July 23, 2021, OMMU issued an update, stating that 590,332 state citizens are eligible patients who can obtain prescriptions from 2,614 registered doctors to buy cannabis from 354 dispensaries throughout the state. This trend is anticipated to continue, with yearly sales estimated to reach $6 billion by 2030.

The Whitney Economics report also supported the claim that the cannabis industry in Florida could contribute more significantly to the economy if the use of the drug was legalized for adults. With a population of about $22 million, the report indicated that Florida could reasonably double its current total of cannabis jobs if adult-use marijuana was legalized.

If any of the 2021 legalization bills were adopted, the report projected Florida's marijuana market to hit $2.1 billion in sales and generate $800 million in state and local taxes, while employing over 60,000 residents.

What is the Marijuana Crime Rate in Florida?

The impact of liberalizing marijuana laws on crime has been a subject of intense debate in recent years. Florida has struggled with lowering crime rates for quite some time. In 2019, Florida had the 14th highest imprisonment rate in the country, with 582 in prison for every 100,000 adults, according to data from 2019 gathered by the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting Program.

However, with recreational marijuana not yet legalized in Florida, it is difficult to consider the impact of legalization on crime rates in the state.

How to Get a Medical Marijuana Card in Florida

A medical marijuana card is a state-issued identification card that permits a patient with a physician's recommendation to obtain or possess marijuana for medicinal use. To use medical marijuana in Florida, an individual must possess a medical marijuana card and have one of the following conditions:

  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig's disease.
  • Cancer
  • Crohn's disease
  • Epilepsy
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Multiple sclerosis (MS)
  • Parkinson's disease
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • A terminal condition diagnosed by another physician
  • Chronic non-malignant ache caused by a qualifying condition
  • Other comparable medical conditions.

To get a Florida medical marijuana card, you must be a permanent resident of the state or a seasonal resident with a qualifying illness who resides in the state for at least 31 consecutive days each calendar year and maintains a temporary residence. Additionally, you must be at least 18 years old or have an adult caregiver approved by the state.

If you meet the requirements, you may proceed to obtain certification from a qualified Florida medical marijuana doctor. You may schedule an appointment with a qualified doctor and present your medical records to the practitioner at the appointment. You may use the physician search tool on the Florida Office of Medical Marijuana Use (OMMU) to find a doctor who has taken the required training and is certified. There are over 2,000 Florida doctors in various specialties, such as oncology, family care, dermatology, and gynecology who are on the list, broken down by county. You can also visit dedicated medical marijuana clinics that have certified doctors.

Ideally, the records should include a previous diagnosis of a qualifying Florida medical marijuana condition, but it is not compulsory. Seasonal residents may bring a lease or deed, a utility bill, or a document from a financial institution or government agency as proof of residence. The doctor may run a series of tests to diagnose a qualifying condition and also require you to sign a detailed consent form. Note that you will be charged for your appointment with the doctor, and depending on your location, may cost between $100 - $300.

If you are recommended by your doctor, you must complete and submit an application with the State of Florida and pay the $75 application fee. Typically, the state takes 2-4 weeks to process the application. Upon processing, you will be sent an email from the State of Florida. You may apply online or mail the application along with a $75 check or money order to:

Office of Medical Marijuana Use

PO Box 31313

Tampa, FL 33631-3313

To apply online, follow these steps:

  • Get your login information for the Medical Marijuana Use Registry can be found in your email. If the email from OMMU is not in your inbox, it may be in your spam or junk folder.
  • To finish your online application, go to the Medical Marijuana Use Registry's "Your Card" page.
  • Provide all required documentation and payment information for the $75 processing fee. The OMMU website has a complete list of required documentation to prove Florida residency.

For applications on paper:

  • Fill out a Patient Application Form, a Caregiver Application Form, or both if needed.

  • On the third page, indicate whether it is an initial, renewal, or minor application.

  • Fill in the blanks on the form with the following information:

  • A passport-style photo

  • A copy of the required residency proof

  • A $75.00 check or money order made payable to the Florida Department of Health.

Mail your application to the OMMU address above.

To make the ID card application and approval process more efficient, Florida's Medical Marijuana Use Registry is connected to the state's Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles (FLHSMV) demographic database. Using data from the FLHSMV processing times are reduced. Online applications are approved in an average of 10 working days, which is considerably quicker than paper applications.

Note that each patient and designated caregiver (where applicable) must possess a Registry ID Card in order to have access to dispensary products. Florida law requires that every patient be evaluated and recertified within the registry by their provider every 210 days (7 months).

To maintain a valid Medical Marijuana Use Registry identification card, you or your caregiver must submit a renewal application to the department 45 days ahead to the card expiry date, together with the application fee and any necessary supporting documentation. OMMU encourages cardholders to delay applying for renewals until 45 days before their cards expire. A card's expiry date is printed on the front. You can renew your card either electronically or through paper applications. If you are submitting a paper application, ensure to tick the "Renewal Application box" on top of page 3 of the application form. Instructions to complete online renewal applications are contained on the OMMU website.

Note that your medical marijuana card only qualifies you to purchase medical marijuana in Florida. You cannot grow your own marijuana in the State. Florida law only allows licensed dispensing organizations to grow, process, and dispense marijuana.

What is the History of Florida Marijuana?

Floridians made several attempts to legalize medical marijuana between 1978 and 2014 with no success. In 1978, the State Legislature enacted the Therapeutic Research Program, which failed to become operational. The program required federal permission and would have involved pharmacies dispensing marijuana to cancer and glaucoma patients. In 1984, the program was annulled.

In 2012, Bills HJR353 andSJR1028 were introduced as constitutional amendments to allow medical marijuana in Florida. The Bills were introduced by Rep. Jeff Clemens and Sen. Larcenia J. Bullard but never voted on. This was the first time that medical marijuana bills were filed in both the House and the Senate.

In 2014, Florida legislators passed the "Charlotte's Web" Bill also referred to as the Compassionate Medical Care Act. This Act allowed the certified physicians to issue orders for certain patients, allowing them to use low-THC cannabis, which the State defined as cannabis having no more than 0.8% THC and more than 10% CBD.

The Act authorized the Florida Department of Health to establish a patient registry and to license five organizations to produce and distribute cannabis. The original Compassionate Use Act only permitted low-THC cannabis (Charlotte's Web strain) to be administered and bought by cancer and epileptic sufferers. Advocates were successful in getting the Compassionate Medical Cannabis Act on the November 2014 ballot. The measure fell only 2.5 percent shy of the necessary 60 percent yes vote to approve the constitutional amendment.

Several localities, including Miami-Dade County, Tampa, Key West, and Orlando, started allowing police to cite people caught in possession of marijuana rather than arrest them in 2015 The Right to Try Act of Florida enabled doctors to offer experimental therapies to severely sick patients in 2015, and the state added low THC medicinal cannabis to the list of approved medications in 2016.

Medical cannabis activists lobbied the Florida government in 2016 to ease limitations on cannabis usage. In November 2016, the Florida Medical Marijuana Legalization Initiative was presented as a citizen vote and approved with a 71.3 percent majority. The bill created a full-fledged medicinal marijuana program. The Amendment, however, maintained to restrict how medical cannabis patients may consume cannabis. Patients could only utilize edibles, vapes, oils, tablets, and sprays instead of smoking marijuana.

Then, in 2017, in a special session, the Senate passed Bill SB8A which created strict regulations that applied to Amendment 2, such as making it illegal to purchase dried cannabis flowers and to grow cannabis at home. In 2018, Leon County Circuit Court Judge Karen Gievers ruled that Florida's prohibition on smokable marijuana was unconstitutional and ordered the state to repeal it.

Governor Ron DeSantis signed Senate Bill 182 into law in 2019, eliminating the prior prohibition on smoking medicinal cannabis. As a result, doctors may now recommend dry cannabis to qualifying patients, thus expanding access to medicinal marijuana therapy.

Activists and lawmakers have been seeking to legalize recreational cannabis in recent times but with no success. In April, the Florida Supreme Court ruled by a 5-2 margin that a ballot measure by the Make it Legal group was "misleading." Another group, Sensible Florida which gathered nearly 30,000 signatures of the requisite 891,589 required to put their pro-recreational cannabis use initiative on the ballot in 2022, had their proposal rejected. The Florida Supreme Court also ruled by a 5-2 margin in June 2021, declaring the proposed ballot measure as misleading. The Supreme Court ruled nothing in the proposal's actual wording limits marijuana use.